All posts by Janice LeBoeuf

Do you have a water contingency plan?

Jennifer Jarvis, OMAFRA

In 2016, many areas of the province saw very warm and dry conditions, creating challenges for horticulture and field crop producers. Many wells were still dry leading into the winter. In other years, like the start of the 2017 growing season, the province experienced periods of excessive rain, leading to saturated soils and flooding.

No one can control the weather, but we can plan for it. The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) encourages you to plan for future weather – conserving water and using it efficiently can help during low water conditions, and having effective drainage systems in place can help with saturated soils and runoff. Continue reading Do you have a water contingency plan?

Making Lemonade Out of Lemons – A Tomato Fungicide Stewardship Tip Amidst Changing Regulations

Cheryl Trueman (Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph) & Janice LeBoeuf (OMAFRA)

It seems like recently there have been a rash of proposed or pending pesticide regulation changes that affect field growers, and tomato growers are no exception. There are re-evaluations ongoing for a number of products used in tomatoes, including mancozeb, neonicotinoids, and Lannate, as well as Ethrel, but the big one that comes to mind for field tomato growers is the proposed changes to the use of chlorothalonil (Bravo, Echo). The final outcome of this review is not yet known, but it’s likely that significant changes to the chlorothalonil labels are coming.

Chlorothalonil is a go-to fungicide for tomato growers. Data from trials at Ridgetown Campus demonstrate its value. Chlorothalonil is often just as good at controlling early blight, Septoria leaf spot, and anthracnose fruit rot as alternative fungicides, and it also provides protection from late blight, which many targeted fungicides do not. It’s a good value active ingredient for tomato disease management and has a low risk of resistance development. But, if proposed changes go through, the number of chlorothalonil applications you can use will be drastically cut.

So, have you thought about how you are going to adapt? Continue reading Making Lemonade Out of Lemons – A Tomato Fungicide Stewardship Tip Amidst Changing Regulations

Sarnia-Lambton Bio-Industrial Symposium

Lambton College, Bioindustrial Innovation Canada (BIC) and the Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership (SLEP) cordially invites you to attend the inaugural Sarnia-Lambton Bio-Industrial Symposium at the Guildwood Inn in Sarnia, Ontario, from 8:30am to 4:30pm. The symposium is a one day event focusing on presentations from local, federal and provincial agricultural representatives, upstream and downstream processing industries, bio chemical and bio material product industries, and also federal, provincial and local funding agencies. Register online (free event). Continue reading Sarnia-Lambton Bio-Industrial Symposium

Storing Pesticide Mix Overnight

From Sprayers101.com:

Not being able to finish a tank due to weather or any other reason happens to just about everyone. Is it OK to simply leave the sprayer as is, and resume spraying later after some agitation? In many cases, the answer is yes. Most pesticide mixtures are stable in short term storage. On resuming spraying, an agitation…

Continue reading at: Storing Pesticide Mix Overnight — Sprayers 101

New, free soil health publications

Soil health in OntarioThe Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs is rolling out a total of 21 new soil health publications. These publications provide best management practices to help you preserve and conserve soil while improving soil health and crop production.

Check out these five new titles on our Soil Health in Ontario web page:

  • Adding Organic Amendments
  • Erosion Control Structures
  • Cropland Retirement
  • Soil Health in Ontario
  • Field Windbreaks

Continue reading New, free soil health publications

Herbicide injury symptoms in tomatoes

Darren Robinson, University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus; Janice LeBoeuf, OMAFRA, Ridgetown

Introduction

Herbicides are useful tools for the management of weeds.  The herbicides registered for use in tomatoes are selective in their activity, injuring or killing weeds while being safe to use on the crop. Crop injury may occur, generally when a crop is stressed beyond its ability to adequately deal with a herbicide application.  Injury due to herbicides can arise as a result of several factors, including weather-related stress, soil factors such as light soil texture and low soil organic matter, shallow planting and sensitive crop varieties.  The pages in this section contain information on herbicide injury for several products registered on tomatoes in Canada. Continue reading Herbicide injury symptoms in tomatoes