Category Archives: Tomatoes

Making Lemonade Out of Lemons – A Tomato Fungicide Stewardship Tip Amidst Changing Regulations

Cheryl Trueman (Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph) & Janice LeBoeuf (OMAFRA)

It seems like recently there have been a rash of proposed or pending pesticide regulation changes that affect field growers, and tomato growers are no exception. There are re-evaluations ongoing for a number of products used in tomatoes, including mancozeb, neonicotinoids, and Lannate, as well as Ethrel, but the big one that comes to mind for field tomato growers is the proposed changes to the use of chlorothalonil (Bravo, Echo). The final outcome of this review is not yet known, but it’s likely that significant changes to the chlorothalonil labels are coming.

Chlorothalonil is a go-to fungicide for tomato growers. Data from trials at Ridgetown Campus demonstrate its value. Chlorothalonil is often just as good at controlling early blight, Septoria leaf spot, and anthracnose fruit rot as alternative fungicides, and it also provides protection from late blight, which many targeted fungicides do not. It’s a good value active ingredient for tomato disease management and has a low risk of resistance development. But, if proposed changes go through, the number of chlorothalonil applications you can use will be drastically cut.

So, have you thought about how you are going to adapt? Continue reading Making Lemonade Out of Lemons – A Tomato Fungicide Stewardship Tip Amidst Changing Regulations

Herbicide injury symptoms in tomatoes

Darren Robinson, University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus; Janice LeBoeuf, OMAFRA, Ridgetown

Introduction

Herbicides are useful tools for the management of weeds.  The herbicides registered for use in tomatoes are selective in their activity, injuring or killing weeds while being safe to use on the crop. Crop injury may occur, generally when a crop is stressed beyond its ability to adequately deal with a herbicide application.  Injury due to herbicides can arise as a result of several factors, including weather-related stress, soil factors such as light soil texture and low soil organic matter, shallow planting and sensitive crop varieties.  The pages in this section contain information on herbicide injury for several products registered on tomatoes in Canada. Continue reading Herbicide injury symptoms in tomatoes

Holding Vegetable Plug Transplants

Janice LeBoeuf, OMAFRA Vegetable Crop Specialist, Ridgetown

Tomato transplantsHealthy and hardy transplants are a critical part of a successful season.  When field planting is delayed by rain, rain, rain, or cold weather and plug transplants must be held, it is important to monitor them closely to maintain plant health and vigour.

Plug transplants can be held in the greenhouse but if already shipped to the field grower, can be stored outside, in an area that receives direct sunlight and is sheltered from the wind. The racks should be elevated to prevent root growth through the bottom of the plugs.  If there is a risk of frost, be sure to bring the transplants inside – to a building,  a shed, or a greenhouse/hoophouse, if you have one available.  Plants should not generally be stored in an enclosed trailer or building for more than 1 or 2 days, as this may result in very soft, elongated plants, especially in crops such as tomatoes. Continue reading Holding Vegetable Plug Transplants

Tomato Day 2017

District 1 of the Ontario Processing Vegetable Growers and OMAFRA present…….

The 41st Annual Tomato Day
Thursday, March 2, 2017     8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Countryview Golf Course
25393 St. Clair Rd. (Hwy 40), Dover Centre, ON

Admission: $30 (includes educational program, trade show, hot lunch).
No preregistration required.

Program: Continue reading Tomato Day 2017

Tomato fruit rots

There are many potential causes of fruit rot in tomato. In processing crops, we often see them when crop maturity is getting ahead of harvest.

Anthracnose

Anthracnose on tomatoThe most important fact to know about anthracnose fruit rot of tomato is that while symptoms appear only on ripe fruit, infections can be initiated on green fruit (you can’t see those infections). Fungicide programs must begin early enough to prevent the initial infection of green fruit. You can’t spray away an infection that’s already happened.

Black mold (alternaria)

Black mold (alternaria) on tomato fruitOverripe tomato fruit may develop black mold caused by Alternaria alternata. Symptoms can range from small, dark blotches to large sunken areas Lesions may develop soft, black fungal growth in warm, humid weather. Black fungal growth may also develop on existing wounds or lesions. Continue reading Tomato fruit rots

Stink Bug Alert!

Hannah Fraser, Entomologist – Horticulture, OMAFRA – Guelph

Vegetable and fruit growers should be on the look-out for signs of stink bugs in their fields and orchards. In the last few weeks, we have visited apple orchards in Niagara with fruit showing damage that is characteristic of stink bugs (Figures 1-4). Early injury is easy to overlook (Figures 5 & 6). We have also seen injury in tomatoes (Figure 7-8). Continue reading Stink Bug Alert!