Category Archives: Nematodes

Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention presentations now available online

Ontario Fruit & Vegetable ConventionPresentation slides from the 2017 Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention (OFVC) are now posted online. Field vegetable content at this year’s OFVC included: Continue reading Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention presentations now available online

OMAFRA IPM Scout Training Workshops for 2017

These workshops are available for those who will be scouting horticultural crops this year.

To register, please contact OMAFRA’s Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300.

Planning is underway for the scout training workshop for hops. Details will be provided soon.           

GENERAL

Introduction to IPM

  • May 2, 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Conference Rm 1, 2 and 3, 1st Floor,1 Stone Rd. West, Guelph
  • Workshop Leader: Denise Beaton
  • Notes: Lunch on your own. Handouts provided. Pay parking ($12/day).

VEGETABLE CROPS Continue reading OMAFRA IPM Scout Training Workshops for 2017

66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference

The 66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference will be held April 12-13 at the Bradford and District Memorial Community located at 125 Simcoe St., Bradford, ON. The conference is free and registration starts at 8:30. For more details please see:  http://www.uoguelph.ca/muckcrop/muckconference.html

Continue reading 66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference

Watch out for Stem and Bulb Nematode Symptoms in Garlic

Michael Celetti, Plant Pathologist, Horticulture Crops
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs
Guelph, Ontario

The cool wet weather experienced last fall (2014) and the recent rain in June 2015 was ideal for stem and bulb nematode (Ditylenchus dipsacci) to multiply and spread this growing season. This pest can cause significant damage to garlic crops. Obvious symptoms in garlic often appear around the time when scapes emerge in late June or early July.

Stem and bulb nematodes are often introduced into a field by planting infested garlic cloves. One stage (4th juvenile) of the nematode is particularly adapted to resist desiccation and freezing and can persist for many years under dry or cold conditions. Young juvenile nematodes within the infested cloves develop into adults during the fall and spring. When the nematodes have reached maturity, they mate and the females lay eggs. The nematodes can live from 45 to 75 days, depending upon the condition, and a single female can lay up to 500 eggs within her life span. It only takes 19 days after hatching from eggs to develop into mature adults when temperatures average around 15oC. The short period of time between egg hatch and maturity together with the frequency of reproduction during the life span of a female often results in an explosion of this pest population under cool wet conditions.

Continue reading Watch out for Stem and Bulb Nematode Symptoms in Garlic

Nematode Management in Hort Crops Session at the 2014 OFVC

At the Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention (OFVC)  in Niagara Falls, ON on Thursday, February, 20th, 2014 there will a Nematode Management in Hort Crops session. Session program is available online at http://www.ofvc.ca/sessions_day2.html#nematode. Visit http://www.ofvc.ca to see the rest of the convention program and to register. Continue reading Nematode Management in Hort Crops Session at the 2014 OFVC

Cover Crops – can be so much more!

Anne Verhallen, Soil Management Specialist – Horticulture, OMAF & MRA – Ridgetown

From ONvegetables in The Grower, August 2013

Cover crops are a must for vegetable soils; holding on to soil to prevent blowing in the spring, filtering and anchoring soils during heavy rainstorms and helping to stabilize field headlands and harvest driveways. But there is more, much more that cover crops can do in a vegetable production system.

Rotation benefits – achieving a good crop rotation can be challenging with high value vegetable land and limited land base. Select cover crops from plant families unrelated to your crops to ensure that you get the most rotation benefit. Getting a different root system and different crop residues in the system will encourage a wider variety of soil organisms and in particular, support beneficial organisms. Rotation research in field crops suggests a yield increase of approximately 10 per cent can be achieved with a well-planned and varied rotation. Continue reading Cover Crops – can be so much more!

Soil fumigants and tomato production, Part III

Exploring factors that can contribute to inconsistent results with fumigation

Jump to:    Part I    Part II

Cheryl Trueman, M.Sc., College Professor, Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph; Janice LeBoeuf, Vegetable Crop Specialist, OMAFRA – Ridgetown; Anne Verhallen, Soil Management Specialist – Horticulture, OMAFRA – Ridgetown

In two previous articles on this topic, we discussed what fumigants are and how they work, and shared research results on the efficacy of metam sodium from trials in Ontario and other regions conducted in field tomato production systems. In Ontario, recent research results indicate that metam sodium is not an effective tool for improving yield associated with root rot and vine decline under field conditions. In other regions of North America, results are mixed. In this article, we’ll explore factors that can contribute to inconsistent results with fumigation.

A number of factors can contribute to the success (or lack of success) of a fumigant application with metam sodium. These factors include: the method of application, the conditions at the time of application, activities that occur at the site post-application, inherent soil properties, and the history of fumigation at the site. These factors may impact the size of the fumigated zone in the soil profile, or the length of time the target pests are exposed to the fumigant. Continue reading Soil fumigants and tomato production, Part III