All posts by Travis Cranmer

Downy mildew of brassica vegetables

Downy mildew of brassicas (Hyaloperonospora parasitica syn. Peronospora parasitica) is a fungal-like oomycete that can be devastating in cooler, wet weather. While the ideal temperature for downy mildew development is 8-16˚C it can infect in temperatures outside that range. Prolonged leaf wetness due to fog, dew, or evening irrigation can create ideal conditions for the pathogen to develop.

Downy mildew is most devastating on Continue reading Downy mildew of brassica vegetables

Switch® Fungicide label expanded for Celery Leaf Curl

J. Chaput, OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of an URMULE registration for Switch® Fungicide for control of anthracnose (leaf curl) on celery in Canada. Switch® Fungicide was already labeled for use on a number of crops in Canada for control of several diseases.

This minor use project was submitted as a result of minor use priorities established by growers and extension personnel.

The following is provided as an abbreviated, general outline only. Users should be making pest management decisions within a robust integrated disease management program and should consult the complete label before using switch fungicide.


Switch® Fungicide is TOXIC to aquatic organisms. Fludioxonil is persistent and may carryover. It is recommended that any products containing fludioxonil not be used in areas treated with this product during the previous season. Do not permit Switch Fungicide to contaminate off-target areas or aquatic habitats when spraying or when cleaning and rinsing spray equipment or containers. 

Follow all precautions and detailed directions for use on the Switch® Fungicide label carefully. 

For a copy of the new minor use label contact your local crop specialist, regional supply outlet or visit the PMRA label site.

This article is not intended to be an endorsement or recommendation for this particular product, but rather a notice of registration activity.

 

 

Confine Extra fungicide label expanded via minor use program for suppression of bacterial spot of leaf lettuce

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of URMULE registrations for Confine Extra fungicide (mono and di-potassium salts of phosphorus acid 53%) for the suppression of bacterial leaf spot (Xanthomonas campestris p.v. vitians) on leaf lettuce in Canada.  Continue reading Confine Extra fungicide label expanded via minor use program for suppression of bacterial spot of leaf lettuce

Scouting for onion thrips

Onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) feed on more than just onions; they also feed on cabbage, leaf lettuce, a variety of other vegetables and fruits, field crops, and many weed species. Thrips are unique from other insects as they have rasping-sucking mouthparts that allow them to scratch the cell walls of leaves, suck up the cell contents including the chlorophyll, and leave behind a shiny, translucent trail on the leaf. A single female can produce Continue reading Scouting for onion thrips

Stemphylium is the new Botrytis

Stemphylium leaf blight (Stemphylium vesicarium) of onion starts as yellow-tan, water-soaked lesions developing into elongated spots. As these spots cover the entire leaves, onions prematurely defoliate thereby reducing the yield and causing the crop to be more susceptible to other pathogens. Stemphylium was first identified in Ontario in 2008 and has since spread throughout the Holland Marsh and other onion growing areas in southwestern Ontario.

Stemphylium leaf blight can sometimes be misdiagnosed as Continue reading Stemphylium is the new Botrytis

The benefits of removing garlic scapes

The wild ancestors of today’s garlic, Allium sativum, originated thousands of years ago in what is believed to be garlic’s center of origin, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. Garlic spread across the globe as it became a popular vegetable, spice, and medicinal plant. The varieties of cultivars we have today were each selected for Continue reading The benefits of removing garlic scapes