Category Archives: Nutrients

4R Phosphorus Management Practices for Major Commodity Crops of North America

The International Plant Nutrition Institute has just released a new summary of best management practices for reduction of phosphorus losses for the major commodity crops of North America. Many of these practices are applicable to vegetable production, as well.

4R Phosphorus Management Practices for Major Commodity Crops of North America

Find this and other plant nutrition resources at http://www.ipni.net/issuereview or go directly to the pdf.

Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention presentations now available online

Ontario Fruit & Vegetable ConventionPresentation slides from the 2017 Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention (OFVC) are now posted online. Field vegetable content at this year’s OFVC included: Continue reading Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention presentations now available online

Lake Erie draft action plans posted to Ontario Environmental Registry

Two draft action plans have been posted to Ontario’s Environmental Registry for public comments.

Policy Proposal Notice: Canada-Ontario Action Plan for Lake Erie

Comment Period: 60 days. Submissions may be made before May 09, 2017.

Partnering in Phosphorus Control Draft Action PlanPolicy Decision Notice: Reducing Phosphorous to minimize Algal Blooms in Lake Erie

The draft Action Plan is posted for public input and can be found through this link. The Action Plan will be finalized no later than February 2018.

66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference

The 66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference will be held April 12-13 at the Bradford and District Memorial Community located at 125 Simcoe St., Bradford, ON. The conference is free and registration starts at 8:30. For more details please see:  http://www.uoguelph.ca/muckcrop/muckconference.html

Continue reading 66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference

Nutrient Application: Timing Matters

Jennifer Jarvis, OMAFRA

There’s a right time for everything.

Every year, the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) receives calls about winter spreading. Long, cold winters that come after a wet fall and/or late harvest tend to make winter spreading more common. However, spreading on frozen or snow covered ground, on saturated soil or before major rain events is not a good practice, even if storages are full. Continue reading Nutrient Application: Timing Matters