Category Archives: Insecticides

Carrot Weevil Control Update

Carrot weevil remains the most important insect pest to many Ontario carrot growers, and the amount of damage seems to be increasing in recent years. Carrot weevil females overwinter in the soil and plant debris and lay their eggs in cavities in the crown of the carrots. These eggs develop and hatch into larvae and begin to feed on the carrot root. Feeding damage from the carrot weevil larvae causes unmarketable tunneling near the crown of the carrot and can account for significant losses to commercial growers.

Continue reading Carrot Weevil Control Update

Preventing Yield Loss from Flea Beetles

Flea beetles are a common crop pest of crucifers in Ontario and overwinter as adults near the soil surface in debris and stubble from the previous crop. They typically become active with the first extended period of warm weather in the early spring as the leaf litter begins to thaw. The beetles feed on weeds throughout the field and have the ability to fly on calm days and will attack brassica seedlings as they emerge or transplants as they are planted.

Females will begin laying eggs in soil for about 30 days. Flea beetle larvae will hatch from eggs 12 days later and feed on the root hairs and taproots of seedlings. Left unchecked, adults will feed on leaves of transplants and the larvae will burrowing into the plant near the juncture of the root and stem. Continue reading Preventing Yield Loss from Flea Beetles

66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference

The 66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference will be held April 12-13 at the Bradford and District Memorial Community located at 125 Simcoe St., Bradford, ON. The conference is free and registration starts at 8:30. For more details please see:  http://www.uoguelph.ca/muckcrop/muckconference.html

Continue reading 66th Annual Muck Vegetable Growers Conference

Growers requested to complete survey on neonic use

The Canadian Horticultural Council (CHC) is currently preparing a response to PMRA’s proposed re-evaluation decision on imidacloprid and other neonicotinoid use (example products: Admire, Intercept, Genesis, Gaucho). To ensure an effective response, CHC requests feedback from growers on their use of these pesticides. Each survey takes about 15-20 minutes to complete, and can be saved and continued at any time prior to the deadline. Submission deadline: February 6, 2017. Continue reading Growers requested to complete survey on neonic use

How to assess spray coverage in vegetable crops

From sprayers101.com. By Jason Deveau, OMAFRA.

Water sensitive paperSprayer operators recognize the importance of matching their sprayer settings to the crop to optimize efficacy. For example, spraying a protective fungicide in field tomato should require a different approach from spraying a locally systemic insecticide in staked peppers. Knowing this, many operators make ad hoc changes and then wait to “see if it worked”. A process is required that empowers the operator to make systematic changes to their program and assess coverage immediately. Continue reading How to assess spray coverage in vegetable crops

Scouting for pepper weevil in field peppers

Pepper weevil is a pest that is likely unfamiliar to most Ontario field pepper growers. It has been found in Ontario previously (https://onvegetables.com/2010/06/01/pepper-weevil/) and there have been reports of its presence in 2016. As it can be a very serious pest of peppers, it is advisable for all pepper growers to monitor for the pest in their crop. Pepper weevil can affect both field and greenhouse pepper crops, but this article will focus on scouting and management in the field.

The insect

  • Adults are small weevils, 2-3.5 mm in length (Figures 1 and 2).
  • Difficult to detect the pepper weevil adults through crop scouting if it is present at low levels
    (unless using pheromone traps).
  • Eggs are laid in the fruit wall, leaving a dimpled scar (Figure 3).
  • Larvae grow and develop inside the pepper fruit; pupae form inside the fruit (Figure 4).
  • New adults create an exit hole and leave the fruit.
Figure 1: Pepper weevil adult on pepper flower bud
Figure 1: Pepper weevil adult on pepper flower bud

Continue reading Scouting for pepper weevil in field peppers