Switch® Fungicide label expanded for Celery Leaf Curl

J. Chaput, OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of an URMULE registration for Switch® Fungicide for control of anthracnose (leaf curl) on celery in Canada. Switch® Fungicide was already labeled for use on a number of crops in Canada for control of several diseases.

This minor use project was submitted as a result of minor use priorities established by growers and extension personnel.

The following is provided as an abbreviated, general outline only. Users should be making pest management decisions within a robust integrated disease management program and should consult the complete label before using switch fungicide.


Switch® Fungicide is TOXIC to aquatic organisms. Fludioxonil is persistent and may carryover. It is recommended that any products containing fludioxonil not be used in areas treated with this product during the previous season. Do not permit Switch Fungicide to contaminate off-target areas or aquatic habitats when spraying or when cleaning and rinsing spray equipment or containers. 

Follow all precautions and detailed directions for use on the Switch® Fungicide label carefully. 

For a copy of the new minor use label contact your local crop specialist, regional supply outlet or visit the PMRA label site.

This article is not intended to be an endorsement or recommendation for this particular product, but rather a notice of registration activity.

 

 

University of Guelph Potato Research Field Day

The UofG along with the Ontario Potato Board will be hosting the Potato Research Field Day on Wednesday August 16th at the Elora Research Station.

Come on out to view over 100 processing and table varieties where you can see the dug potatoes and foliage side by side. You can also hear about low glycemic impact potatoes from Dr. Reena Pinhero and an update on the CHC potato research cluster from Mary Kay Sonier of the PEI Potato Board. A free lunch will also be provided.

The flyer can be found HERE with more details, start time and directions.

2017 Ontario Potato Field Day at HJV Equipment

2017 POTATO FIELD DAY NOTICE August 17

The Ontario Potato Field Day on Thursday August 17 will be a good opportunity for growers, potato industry personnel and anyone interested in potatoes to see what is new in potato equipment, to have a look at new varieties and to exchange information. Potato growers and potato industry personnel from other provinces are welcome to attend.

As always, the Trade Show will feature new potato technology to enhance production practices.

For more information please contact Eugenia Banks (eugeniabanks@onpotato.ca, 519-766-8073)

Late blight alert – July 27th, 2017

This information is updated from an earlier article by Janice LeBoeuf.

We have had multiple reports of late blight in conventionally managed tomato fields this week.  Typically, this disease is well managed in tomatoes with a broadspectrum fungicide program including chlorothalonil.  However, high disease pressure due to environmental conditions, combined with a dense leaf canopy and rapid growth may have resulted in poor spray coverage and reduced efficacy.

Commercial growers should scout often and ensure they are using fungicides with good late blight activity in their fungicide program.  When late blight is in the area, spray intervals should be shortened.

Under continued high disease pressure, growers should consider adding a targeted late blight fungicide to the spray program.  If late blight has been identified in a field, use a fungicide with curative and antisporulent activity, see the table below for late blight fungicides and their properties. Continue reading Late blight alert – July 27th, 2017

Time to Start Scouting for Powdery Mildew

This is a re-post from 2016 – Late-July to early-August is the key time for powdery mildew management!  With any disease, preventative management provides the best control.

Powdery mildew typically arrives in Southern Ontario in mid-to-late July. Plants are most susceptible to infection during the fruit sizing and development. Poor control results in decreased yield and poor fruit quality at harvest. The threshold for treatment is 1 lesions/50 plants. Optimum powdery mildew control is a combination of variety selection, fungicide timing and fungicide selection.

Powdery Mildew Lesion on the Lower Leaf Surface
Powdery Mildew Lesion on the Lower Leaf Surface

Cheryl Trueman, a vegetable pest management researcher at the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown Campus, has been conducting powdery mildew efficacy trials since 2009. In these trials, several products consistently provided good control of powdery mildew. These products are powdery mildew targeted, and have a single site mode of action. To prevent the development of resistance, it is essential to always rotate between different fungicide groups and/or tank mix with a broad spectrum fungicide.

Powdery Mildew Targeted Fungicides Showing Consistent Control in the Ridgetown Field Trials:

Group 13: Quintec (quinoxyfen)
Quintec was the most consistent powdery mildew product tested in Ridgetown. It provided excellent control in 4/5 years and good control in 1/5 years tested.

Group U8: Vivando (metrafenone)
Vivando provided excellent control in 1/3 years and good control in 2/3 years and tested.

Group 7: Fontelis (penthiopyrad), Aprovia (benzovindiflupyr), Sercadis (fluapyroxad) and Pristine (boscalid/pyraclostrobin).
Fontellis was somewhat less consistent. Control with this produce ranged from excellent to poor, depending on the year. It provided excellent control in 1/5 years, good control in 2/5 years and poor control in 2/5 years. Note: Aprovia, Sercadis and Pristine were not tested in the Ridgetown Campus trials.

Group 3: Inspire (difenoconazole), Proline (prothioconazole) and Quadris Top (azoxystrobin/difenoconazole)
Inspire provided a level of control similar to Fontelis; good control in 3/5 years, and poor control in 2/5 years. Proline and Quadris Top were only tested for one year in the Ridgetown trials, in which they both provided good control.

Fungicides containing chlorothalonil (Bravo ZN and Echo) provided a lower level of powdery mildew control, but are still better than the untreated checks. They also control a broad range of other foliar diseases including scab and alternaria.

Research in Ontario and other jurisdictions indicates that the group 11 (QoI) fungicides, Cabrio (pyraclostrobin) and azoxystrobin (a component of Quadris Top) no longer control powdery mildew. However, they may provide control of other cucurbit diseases such as anthracnose and alternaria.

Additional reading: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/IPM/english/cucurbits/diseases-and-disorders/powdery-mildew.html#advanced

Cucurbit Downy Mildew Report for the Week of July 24th, 2017

Cheryl Trueman, University of Guelph – Ridgetown Campus

Risk of downy mildew to cucumbers and cantaloupe remains high, with new reports regularly occurring throughout the great lakes region.

Scouting for downy mildew in pickling cucumber fields in Norfolk County began on June 13 and in Kent County on June 19.  This is the final cucumber downy mildew scouting report for the 2017 season.

You can track sightings of downy mildew in North America on the IPMpipe Cucurbit Downy Mildew website.

More information:
2017 Downy Mildew Control Strategy for Cucumber Crops

2016 Fungicide efficacy and fungicide program results

Cucurbit Downy Mildew Report for the Week of July 4th, 2017

The downy mildew scouting program is sponsored by the Ontario Cucumber Research Committee. Field scouting in Norfolk County is managed by Tania Keirsebilck-Martin at the Norfolk Fruit Growers’
Association. Field scouting in Kent County is managed by Cheryl  Trueman at the Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph. We thank Elaine Roddy, OMAFRA vegetable specialist, for her guidance with
implementing this program.

Talking About the Weather – 2017 vs 10 year average

The 2017 growing season has been a wet one seemingly across the province, but just how much rain have we received?

Below you can see that since March, we have received more than the average monthly rainfall in nearly all regions of the province. Many regions have received double the monthly average rainfall and this often falls within just a few days.

In most growing areas aside from Eastern and Northern Ontario, the daily maximum is within 0.3°C of the 10 year average. However, the daily minimum temperatures are averaging nearly 1°C warmer than the 10-year average. This is accounting for most of the increase in growing degree day accumulation for this year over the average. We haven’t had many hot days over 30°C, but our overnight temperatures have been a little warmer.

Here’s how different regions across the province compare to their 10-year averages in terms of degree days and rainfall.

Harrow

Harrow Continue reading Talking About the Weather – 2017 vs 10 year average

Information for commercial vegetable production in Ontario