Cucurbit Downy Mildew Report for the Week of June 19th, 2017

Cheryl Trueman, University of Guelph – Ridgetown Campus

Scouting for downy mildew in pickling cucumber fields in Norfolk County began on June 13 and in Kent County on June 19.

You can track sightings of downy mildew in North America on the IPMpipe Cucurbit Downy Mildew website.

More information:
2017 Downy Mildew Control Strategy for Cucumber Crops

2016 Fungicide efficacy and fungicide program results

The downy mildew scouting program is sponsored by the Ontario Cucumber Research Committee. Field scouting in Norfolk County is managed by Tania Keirsebilck-Martin at the Norfolk Fruit Growers’
Association. Field scouting in Kent County is managed by Cheryl  Trueman at the Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph. We thank Elaine Roddy, OMAFRA vegetable specialist, for her guidance with
implementing this program.

The benefits of removing garlic scapes

The wild ancestors of today’s garlic, Allium sativum, originated thousands of years ago in what is believed to be garlic’s center of origin, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. Garlic spread across the globe as it became a popular vegetable, spice, and medicinal plant. The varieties of cultivars we have today were each selected for Continue reading The benefits of removing garlic scapes

Do you have a water contingency plan?

Jennifer Jarvis, OMAFRA

In 2016, many areas of the province saw very warm and dry conditions, creating challenges for horticulture and field crop producers. Many wells were still dry leading into the winter. In other years, like the start of the 2017 growing season, the province experienced periods of excessive rain, leading to saturated soils and flooding.

No one can control the weather, but we can plan for it. The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) encourages you to plan for future weather – conserving water and using it efficiently can help during low water conditions, and having effective drainage systems in place can help with saturated soils and runoff. Continue reading Do you have a water contingency plan?

Downy Mildew Report for the week of June 12, 2017

By Cheryl Trueman, University of Guelph – Ridgetown Campus

Scouting for downy mildew in pickling cucumber fields in Norfolk County began on June 13 (3 of 5 sites) and will begin in Kent County on June 19.You can track sightings of downy mildew in North America on the IPMpipe Cucurbit Downy Mildew website.
More information:
2017 Downy Mildew Control Strategy for Cucumber Crops
2016 Fungicide efficacy and fungicide program results.

 

Making Lemonade Out of Lemons – A Tomato Fungicide Stewardship Tip Amidst Changing Regulations

Cheryl Trueman (Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph) & Janice LeBoeuf (OMAFRA)

It seems like recently there have been a rash of proposed or pending pesticide regulation changes that affect field growers, and tomato growers are no exception. There are re-evaluations ongoing for a number of products used in tomatoes, including mancozeb, neonicotinoids, and Lannate, as well as Ethrel, but the big one that comes to mind for field tomato growers is the proposed changes to the use of chlorothalonil (Bravo, Echo). The final outcome of this review is not yet known, but it’s likely that significant changes to the chlorothalonil labels are coming.

Chlorothalonil is a go-to fungicide for tomato growers. Data from trials at Ridgetown Campus demonstrate its value. Chlorothalonil is often just as good at controlling early blight, Septoria leaf spot, and anthracnose fruit rot as alternative fungicides, and it also provides protection from late blight, which many targeted fungicides do not. It’s a good value active ingredient for tomato disease management and has a low risk of resistance development. But, if proposed changes go through, the number of chlorothalonil applications you can use will be drastically cut.

So, have you thought about how you are going to adapt? Continue reading Making Lemonade Out of Lemons – A Tomato Fungicide Stewardship Tip Amidst Changing Regulations

Insect Pest and Crop Degree Day Update – June 5, 2017

Ontario DD Map June 4Insect Degree Days

Weather Station Location Onion Maggot Seedcorn Maggot Cabbage Maggot Carrot Weevil Carrot Rust Fly Aster Leafhopper
(base 4°C) (base 4°C) (base 6°C) (base 7°C) (base 3°C) (base 9°C)
Harrow 613 613 467 400 690 283
Ridgetown 534 534 394 333 611 231
Delhi 519 519 380 321 593 220
Goderich 414 414 292 239 479 164
Guelph 396 396 278 227 463 149
Bradford*  438 438  318 266  501  178
Kemptville 409 409 302 254 471 175
Sudbury 261 261 179 146 314 91

Summary and IPM Update

Onion thrips have been seen on transplants in the Grand Bend area but at this point numbers are low.

Onion maggot flies have emerged and are active in most areas of the province. Current trap counts are low in the Holland Marsh area* and low to moderate in the Grand Bend area.

Cabbage maggot has reached the DD threshold for emergence in Harrow, Ridgetown, Delhi and Bradford. It is nearing the DD threshold in Goderich, Guelph and Kemptville.

The 2nd generation of seedcorn maggot flies have reached the DD threshold for emergence in Harrow. In most other areas of the province, we are just getting over the 1st generation or are currently between generations.

Carrot weevil adults are currently laying eggs, if they are present.

The 1st generation of carrot rust fly has begun to emerge in almost all areas of the province.

Most of the province (Ridgetown, Delhi, Goderich, Guelph, Bradford, Kemptville) have reached the DD threshold for overwintering Aster leafhopper eggs to hatch. Harrow is nearing adult emergence of the local population of Aster Leafhopper adults. Continue reading Insect Pest and Crop Degree Day Update – June 5, 2017

Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

The cabbage maggot (Delia radicum) is the larvae stage of the cabbage root fly which can cause severe damage to all Brassica crops. The adult cabbage maggot is a fly that is about half the size of a house fly and is grey in colour.

In the early spring, cabbage maggot flies emerge from the soil and the females lay small, white eggs ~2-10 cm below the soil line. Depending upon the temperature, eggs hatch 3-7 days later as larvae that immediately start boring Continue reading Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

Information for commercial vegetable production in Ontario