Insect Pest and Crop Degree Day Update – June 5, 2017

Ontario DD Map June 4Insect Degree Days

Weather Station Location Onion Maggot Seedcorn Maggot Cabbage Maggot Carrot Weevil Carrot Rust Fly Aster Leafhopper
(base 4°C) (base 4°C) (base 6°C) (base 7°C) (base 3°C) (base 9°C)
Harrow 613 613 467 400 690 283
Ridgetown 534 534 394 333 611 231
Delhi 519 519 380 321 593 220
Goderich 414 414 292 239 479 164
Guelph 396 396 278 227 463 149
Bradford*  438 438  318 266  501  178
Kemptville 409 409 302 254 471 175
Sudbury 261 261 179 146 314 91

Summary and IPM Update

Onion thrips have been seen on transplants in the Grand Bend area but at this point numbers are low.

Onion maggot flies have emerged and are active in most areas of the province. Current trap counts are low in the Holland Marsh area* and low to moderate in the Grand Bend area.

Cabbage maggot has reached the DD threshold for emergence in Harrow, Ridgetown, Delhi and Bradford. It is nearing the DD threshold in Goderich, Guelph and Kemptville.

The 2nd generation of seedcorn maggot flies have reached the DD threshold for emergence in Harrow. In most other areas of the province, we are just getting over the 1st generation or are currently between generations.

Carrot weevil adults are currently laying eggs, if they are present.

The 1st generation of carrot rust fly has begun to emerge in almost all areas of the province.

Most of the province (Ridgetown, Delhi, Goderich, Guelph, Bradford, Kemptville) have reached the DD threshold for overwintering Aster leafhopper eggs to hatch. Harrow is nearing adult emergence of the local population of Aster Leafhopper adults. Continue reading Insect Pest and Crop Degree Day Update – June 5, 2017

Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

The cabbage maggot (Delia radicum) is the larvae stage of the cabbage root fly which can cause severe damage to all Brassica crops. The adult cabbage maggot is a fly that is about half the size of a house fly and is grey in colour.

In the early spring, cabbage maggot flies emerge from the soil and the females lay small, white eggs ~2-10 cm below the soil line. Depending upon the temperature, eggs hatch 3-7 days later as larvae that immediately start boring Continue reading Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

Sarnia-Lambton Bio-Industrial Symposium

Lambton College, Bioindustrial Innovation Canada (BIC) and the Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership (SLEP) cordially invites you to attend the inaugural Sarnia-Lambton Bio-Industrial Symposium at the Guildwood Inn in Sarnia, Ontario, from 8:30am to 4:30pm. The symposium is a one day event focusing on presentations from local, federal and provincial agricultural representatives, upstream and downstream processing industries, bio chemical and bio material product industries, and also federal, provincial and local funding agencies. Register online (free event). Continue reading Sarnia-Lambton Bio-Industrial Symposium

Storing Pesticide Mix Overnight

From Sprayers101.com:

Not being able to finish a tank due to weather or any other reason happens to just about everyone. Is it OK to simply leave the sprayer as is, and resume spraying later after some agitation? In many cases, the answer is yes. Most pesticide mixtures are stable in short term storage. On resuming spraying, an agitation…

Continue reading at: Storing Pesticide Mix Overnight — Sprayers 101

Insect Pest and Crop Degree Day Update – May 26

Ontario DD Map May 25

Insect Degree Days

 

Weather Station Location Onion Maggot Seedcorn Maggot Cabbage Maggot Carrot Weevil Carrot Rust Fly Aster Leafhopper
(base 4°C) (base 4°C) (base 6°C) (base 7°C) (base 3°C) (base 9°C)
Harrow 468 468 342 285 535 189
Ridgetown 408 408 288 237 475 155
Delhi 391 391 271 222 455 141
Goderich 308 308 206 164 363 108
Guelph 284 284 186 145 342 87
Bradford*  318 318   205 172  369  112
Kemptville 304 304 217 179 356 119
Sudbury 168 168 105 82 210 47

 

Continue reading Insect Pest and Crop Degree Day Update – May 26

New, free soil health publications

Soil health in OntarioThe Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs is rolling out a total of 21 new soil health publications. These publications provide best management practices to help you preserve and conserve soil while improving soil health and crop production.

Check out these five new titles on our Soil Health in Ontario web page:

  • Adding Organic Amendments
  • Erosion Control Structures
  • Cropland Retirement
  • Soil Health in Ontario
  • Field Windbreaks

Continue reading New, free soil health publications

Herbicide injury symptoms in tomatoes

Darren Robinson, University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus; Janice LeBoeuf, OMAFRA, Ridgetown

Introduction

Herbicides are useful tools for the management of weeds.  The herbicides registered for use in tomatoes are selective in their activity, injuring or killing weeds while being safe to use on the crop. Crop injury may occur, generally when a crop is stressed beyond its ability to adequately deal with a herbicide application.  Injury due to herbicides can arise as a result of several factors, including weather-related stress, soil factors such as light soil texture and low soil organic matter, shallow planting and sensitive crop varieties.  The pages in this section contain information on herbicide injury for several products registered on tomatoes in Canada. Continue reading Herbicide injury symptoms in tomatoes

Information for commercial vegetable production in Ontario