Minor Use Label Expansion – Prowl H2O for transplant tomatoes on mineral soil

Jim Chaput – OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of minor use label expansion registration for Prowl® H2O Herbicide for control of labeled weeds on transplanted field tomatoes grown in mineral soil in Canada. Prowl® H2O Herbicide was already labeled for use on a number of crops in Canada for control of several weeds.

This minor use project was submitted by Ontario as a result of minor use priorities established by growers and extension personnel.

The following is provided as an abbreviated, general outline only. Users should be making weed management decisions within a robust integrated weed management program and should consult the complete label before using Prowl® H2O Herbicide.

Crop Target Rate (L/ha) Application Information PHI (days)
Transplanted field tomatoes Labeled weeds 2.2 Apply once as a broadcast surface application prior to transplanting tomatoes 21

Prowl® H2O Herbicide is toxic to aquatic organisms and non-target terrestrial plants.  Do not apply this product or allow drift to other crops or non-target areas. Do not contaminate off-target areas or aquatic habitats when spraying or when cleaning and rinsing spray equipment or containers. In field tomatoes, do not apply Prowl® H2O Herbicide more than once in two consecutive years.

Follow all other precautions, restrictions and directions for use on the Prowl® H2O Herbicide label carefully.

For a copy of the new minor use label contact your local crop specialist, regional supply outlet or visit the PMRA label site https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/consumer-product-safety/pesticides-pest-management/registrants-applicants/tools/pesticide-label-search.html

Minor Use Label Expansion – Delegate for flea beetles on root vegetables

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of a Minor Use label expansion of Delegate Insecticide for suppression of flea beetles on several root vegetables. Crops added to the label:

  • Radish
  • Horseradish
  • Oriental Radish
  • Rutabaga
  • Turnip
  • Carrot

Delegate was already labeled for control of diamondback moth, cabbage looper and imported cabbageworm on these crops.

The following is provided as an abbreviated, general outline only. Users should consult the complete label before using Delegate Insecticide.

Crops Target Rate Max. # of Applications per year Pre-Harvest Interval (PHI)
  • Carrot
  • Radish
  • Horseradish
  • Oriental Radish
  • Rutabaga
  • Turnip
Flea Beetles (suppression) 200 g/ha

(81 g/acre)

3 3 days

Follow all other precautions and directions for use on the Delegate label carefully.

 

Vegetable Summer Student Positions for OMAFRA in Guelph

Job Posting: Field Research Assistant – Pest Management Scout in Vegetable Crops
Organization: Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
Division/Branch: Economic Development Division / Agriculture Development Branch
Position Title: Student – Field Research Assistants in Vegetable Crops
Job Term: Temporary (3 positions) for up to 18 weeks
Location:  1 Stone Road W, Guelph, Ontario
Salary: $14.85 / hour, based on a 36.25 hour work week

Closing Date: January 12, 2018

Continue reading Vegetable Summer Student Positions for OMAFRA in Guelph

Spray Coverage in Carrot Potato and Onion

Jason Deveau, Application Technology Specialist – OMAFRA;
Dennis Van Dyk, Vegetable Crop Specialist – OMAFRA

In recent years, Syngenta has been promoting the Defy 3D nozzle in the UK, which is a 100° flat fan, designed to run alternating 38° forward or backward along the boom. They prescribe a boom height of 50 to 75 cm, 30-40 psi, and travel speeds of 10 to 14 km/h in cereals and vegetables. Compared to a conventional flat fan, they claim that the angle and medium-coarse droplets promise less drift and improved coverage.

In 2017, Hypro and John Deere began distributing the Defy 3D in North America. Our goal was to explore coverage from the 3D in vegetable crops. We compared the nozzle’s performance to common grower practices in onion, potato and carrot in the Holland Marsh area of Ontario.

Marsh

Continue reading Spray Coverage in Carrot Potato and Onion

Nozzle choice in vegetable crops – an Australian perspective

Here is a great article on sprayers101.com about spray nozzle selection in vegetable crops.

During my many years of work in the Australian vegetable and horticultural industry, I am continually asked:

What is the best spray unit to use?

My answer is quite simple:

The one that has been correctly set up and matched to the crop you are spraying.

That can be hard to achieve, especially in vegetable crops where the target can vary enormously from bare ground to upright leaf crops (e.g. onions), to horizontal leaf crops (e.g. potato and brassica).

Generally, I have found that air-assist booms offer the best starting point for achieving good spray coverage of vegetable crops. However, like any spray boom, they must be set up correctly. Air-assist booms are more expensive and require a few more horses to operate, which is why most Australian vegetable growers prefer to make do with a non air-assist boom.

So, if air-assist isn’t an option, it then becomes imperative to determine the most suitable nozzles for their particular requirements. I have worked in many vegetable crops over the years. I’ve held my share of “fluorescent dye nights” and checked spray coverage and canopy penetration with many grower groups. Based on my experience, there are three types of nozzles I recommend for most vegetable crops:

Read more here:

http://sprayers101.com/nozzle-choice-in-vegetable-crops-an-australian-perspective/

 

Information for commercial vegetable production in Ontario