Category Archives: Transplants

Holding Vegetable Plug Transplants

Janice LeBoeuf, OMAFRA Vegetable Crop Specialist, Ridgetown

Tomato transplantsHealthy and hardy transplants are a critical part of a successful season.  When field planting is delayed by rain, rain, rain, or cold weather and plug transplants must be held, it is important to monitor them closely to maintain plant health and vigour.

Plug transplants can be held in the greenhouse but if already shipped to the field grower, can be stored outside, in an area that receives direct sunlight and is sheltered from the wind. The racks should be elevated to prevent root growth through the bottom of the plugs.  If there is a risk of frost, be sure to bring the transplants inside – to a building,  a shed, or a greenhouse/hoophouse, if you have one available.  Plants should not generally be stored in an enclosed trailer or building for more than 1 or 2 days, as this may result in very soft, elongated plants, especially in crops such as tomatoes. Continue reading Holding Vegetable Plug Transplants

New data shows need for an integrated approach to bacterial spot management in Ontario tomato production

Cheryl Trueman, College Professor, Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph

Producers of transplants for field production of fresh market and processing tomatoes typically use regular applications of copper hydroxide (Kocide 2000 or Coppercide WP) to manage bacterial diseases during greenhouse production. The efficacy of this standard practice and other potential new management tools for bacterial spot (Xanthomonas gardneri) were recently evaluated at Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph.

What we did:

  • Each plot consisted of tomato seedlings (cultivar TSH32) growing in one half of a 200-cell tray (approximately 100 plants). Plots were separated by barriers 40 cm in height to prevent interference from neighbouring trays (Figure 1).
  • Product application descriptions are summarized in Table 1. Products tested included:
    • Kocide 2000 (copper hydroxide 53.8%)
    • KleenGrow (didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 7.5%)
    • Actigard (acibenzolar-S-methyl 50%)
    • Actinovate (Streptomyces lydicus strain WYEC 108 1 x 107 cfu/g)
    • AEF 1301 (unknown)
    • Cyclone (lactic acid 10.73 g/L, citric acid 21.37 g/L; present as fermentation products of Lactobacillus casei strain LPT-111)
    • Zerotol (hydrogen peroxide 27%).
  • Trays were inoculated by replacing one healthy seedling at the center of each tray with one seedling inoculated with a copper-sensitive strain of Xanthomonas gardneri and showing symptoms of bacterial spot.
  • The area of the tray with bacterial spot symptoms was monitored over time.

Continue reading New data shows need for an integrated approach to bacterial spot management in Ontario tomato production

Success and Entrust Insecticide labels expanded via Minor Use Program for control of cabbage maggot on greenhouse broccoli transplants in Canada

J. Chaput, OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator, Guelph

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of URMULE registrations for SuccessTM and EntrustTM Insecticides for control of cabbage maggot on greenhouse broccoli transplants in Canada. SuccessTM and EntrustTM Insecticides were already labeled for use on many crops in Canada for a number of pests. Continue reading Success and Entrust Insecticide labels expanded via Minor Use Program for control of cabbage maggot on greenhouse broccoli transplants in Canada

Sumagic label update

Valent Canada, Inc. has received approval for an update to the Sumagic Plant Growth Regulator label for Canada.

The label has been updated to remove the restriction on use in greenhouses with soil floors consisting of sand or sandy loam soil.

The updated label also includes additional statements on avoiding contamination of ground and surface water.

For copies of the updated label, contact Janice LeBoeuf, OMAFRA at janice.leboeuf@ontario.ca or 519-674-1699 or see the Valent Canada website.

Rootshield® HC & WP Biological Fungicide minor use label expansion

J. Chaput, OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator, Guelph

Rootshield® HC & WP Biological Fungicide labels expanded via Minor Use Program to manage diseases on additional crops

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of an URMULE registration for Rootshield WP® and Rootshield HC® Biological Fungicide for management of diseases on greenhouse vegetable transplants, ginseng, greenhouse and field fruiting vegetables, cucurbit vegetables and greenhouse ornamentals in Canada. Rootshield WP® and Rootshield HC® Biological Fungicide were already labeled for management of diseases on some greenhouse vegetables, ornamentals, strawberries and as a bean seed treatment in Canada. Continue reading Rootshield® HC & WP Biological Fungicide minor use label expansion

Vegetable grafting resources

OSU/OARDC-OSUE Tomato Grafting Guide
OSU/OARDC-OSUE Tomato Grafting Guide

The Ohio State University/OARDC-OSUE Tomato Grafting Guide has been updated and the new version can be downloaded at no charge. Version 2 of the Guide is 27 pages longer than version 1; original sections have been enhanced and a commercial tomato rootstock table, a seed-to-grafted plant calculator/seeding scheduling aid, a stem diameter chart, an introduction to splice grafting, a section on pepper grafting and additional, high-resolution images of the grafting process have been included. To obtain version 2 of the Guide, please visit http://hcs.osu.edu/vpslab/grafting-guide and click Request a copy of the Grafting Guide.  You will be sent an email that will prompt you to download the guide.

A source for research-based information on vegetable grafting is http://www.vegetablegrafting.org/.  There are sections on cucurbit and solanaceae grafting, with dozens of links to online resources.

A vegetable grafting symposium is being held in San Diego, CA on November 6, 2013.  Information can be found at http://www.vegetablegrafting.org/2013/09/2013-vegetable-grafting-symposium/.

Tomato Plant Spacing Research

Growers who lost plantings to frost may find it challenging to find a supply of transplants for replanting.  In such a case, reducing plant populations will stretch out the available transplant supply.  But what impact will this have on production?

There has actually been quite a bit of research in Ontario on tomato plant populations, but it was done between 1988 and 2003 on processing tomato cultivars.  There was some fresh market tomato work in the mid-1990s in North Carolina.  More recently, there has been some work on processing tomatoes in Ohio. Continue reading Tomato Plant Spacing Research