Tag Archives: IPM

Scouting for onion thrips

Onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) feed on more than just onions; they also feed on cabbage, leaf lettuce, a variety of other vegetables and fruits, field crops, and many weed species. Thrips are unique from other insects as they have rasping-sucking mouthparts that allow them to scratch the cell walls of leaves, suck up the cell contents including the chlorophyll, and leave behind a shiny, translucent trail on the leaf. A single female can produce Continue reading Scouting for onion thrips

Cucurbit Downy Mildew Report for the Week of June 19th, 2017

Cheryl Trueman, University of Guelph – Ridgetown Campus

Scouting for downy mildew in pickling cucumber fields in Norfolk County began on June 13 and in Kent County on June 19.

You can track sightings of downy mildew in North America on the IPMpipe Cucurbit Downy Mildew website.

More information:
2017 Downy Mildew Control Strategy for Cucumber Crops

2016 Fungicide efficacy and fungicide program results

The downy mildew scouting program is sponsored by the Ontario Cucumber Research Committee. Field scouting in Norfolk County is managed by Tania Keirsebilck-Martin at the Norfolk Fruit Growers’
Association. Field scouting in Kent County is managed by Cheryl  Trueman at the Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph. We thank Elaine Roddy, OMAFRA vegetable specialist, for her guidance with
implementing this program.

Downy Mildew Report for the week of June 12, 2017

By Cheryl Trueman, University of Guelph – Ridgetown Campus

Scouting for downy mildew in pickling cucumber fields in Norfolk County began on June 13 (3 of 5 sites) and will begin in Kent County on June 19.You can track sightings of downy mildew in North America on the IPMpipe Cucurbit Downy Mildew website.
More information:
2017 Downy Mildew Control Strategy for Cucumber Crops
2016 Fungicide efficacy and fungicide program results.

 

Time to Scout for Asparagus Beetles

Asparagus beetle activity is on the rise. The adult beetles hide in soil cracks or underneath residue during the heat of the day.  Egg laying is often the most obvious sign of their activity. The presence of eggs on the harvest spears, may affect marketability. On young fern, heavy amounts of larval feeding has a negative impact on growth and development.

As harvest concludes, scout plantings regularly as the spears begin to elongate and develop a full canopy of fern. Spray thresholds are as follows:

Eggs:   2 /10 spears with eggs
Larvae:   50% of plants with   larvae OR 10% Defoliation
Adults:   5-10% of   plants infested

If controls are required during the harvest season, play close attention to the pre-harvest intervals.  Products with a 24-hr pre-harvest interval include: malathion (Malathion 85E), cypermethrin (Mako, Upside 2.5 EC), and acetamiprid (Assail 70WP).

Spotted Asparagus Beetle (Hannah Stevens, retired MSU)
Common asparagus beetle (Hannah Stevens, retired MSU)

Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

The cabbage maggot (Delia radicum) is the larvae stage of the cabbage root fly which can cause severe damage to all Brassica crops. The adult cabbage maggot is a fly that is about half the size of a house fly and is grey in colour.

In the early spring, cabbage maggot flies emerge from the soil and the females lay small, white eggs ~2-10 cm below the soil line. Depending upon the temperature, eggs hatch 3-7 days later as larvae that immediately start boring Continue reading Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

IPM Scout Training Workshops Begin This Week

ONfruit

The free OMAFRA IPM scout training workshops are available for those who will be scouting horticultural crops this year. Be sure to register if you or your scout are planning to attend!

To register, please contact OMAFRA’s Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 or ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca.

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Preventing Yield Loss from Flea Beetles

Flea beetles are a common crop pest of crucifers in Ontario and overwinter as adults near the soil surface in debris and stubble from the previous crop. They typically become active with the first extended period of warm weather in the early spring as the leaf litter begins to thaw. The beetles feed on weeds throughout the field and have the ability to fly on calm days and will attack brassica seedlings as they emerge or transplants as they are planted.

Females will begin laying eggs in soil for about 30 days. Flea beetle larvae will hatch from eggs 12 days later and feed on the root hairs and taproots of seedlings. Left unchecked, adults will feed on leaves of transplants and the larvae will burrowing into the plant near the juncture of the root and stem. Continue reading Preventing Yield Loss from Flea Beetles