Tag Archives: pepper

Scouting for pepper weevil in field peppers

Pepper weevil is a pest that is likely unfamiliar to most Ontario field pepper growers. It has been found in Ontario previously (https://onvegetables.com/2010/06/01/pepper-weevil/) and there have been reports of its presence in 2016. As it can be a very serious pest of peppers, it is advisable for all pepper growers to monitor for the pest in their crop. Pepper weevil can affect both field and greenhouse pepper crops, but this article will focus on scouting and management in the field.

The insect

  • Adults are small weevils, 2-3.5 mm in length (Figures 1 and 2).
  • Difficult to detect the pepper weevil adults through crop scouting if it is present at low levels
    (unless using pheromone traps).
  • Eggs are laid in the fruit wall, leaving a dimpled scar (Figure 3).
  • Larvae grow and develop inside the pepper fruit; pupae form inside the fruit (Figure 4).
  • New adults create an exit hole and leave the fruit.
Figure 1: Pepper weevil adult on pepper flower bud
Figure 1: Pepper weevil adult on pepper flower bud

Continue reading Scouting for pepper weevil in field peppers

Pepper weevil in field peppers

Pepper weevil adult on pepper budPepper weevil is not usually given much thought in field peppers in Ontario, but from time to time it might be found in a localized area. It is a pest to be aware of, because there are very few external signs that indicate there is larvae present inside the pepper fruit.

Pepper weevil is unlikely to survive typical winter conditions in Ontario unless in a protected area, so risk factors for the pest include proximity to pepper greenhouses/packing sheds or culls/waste plant material from these operations or from areas with warm winters, like the southern US. If you are in a risk area, consider field scouting and pheromone traps. Continue reading Pepper weevil in field peppers

IPM Scout Training Workshops for 2016

Here are the currently scheduled IPM scout workshops available for those who will be scouting horticultural crops this year. To register contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300. (Updated Mar. 15 with sweet corn, bean, peas, cucurbit, asparagus. Updated Mar. 11 with hops, lettuce, celery, onions, carrots, tender fruit and grapes, cole crops, ginseng.)

Introduction to IPM

  • April 28, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • Conference Rm 1, 2 and 3, 1st Floor,1 Stone Rd., Guelph
  • Workshop leader: Denise Beaton
  • Notes: Lunch on your own. Handouts provided. Have to pay for parking.

Hops

  • April 8, 1:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Large Boardroom, Woodstock OMAFRA Resource Centre
  • Workshop Leader: Melanie Filotas
  • Notes: Handouts provided.

Tomatoes & Peppers

  • April 29, 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
  • PSC 003, Pestell Building (lower level), Ridgetown Campus
  • Workshop leader: Janice LeBoeuf
  • Notes: Handouts provided. Lunch on your own. See Resources for Vegetable Crop Scouts.

Continue reading IPM Scout Training Workshops for 2016

New pesticide registrations or label expansions for tomato, pepper, eggplant

There’s quite a bit new in field tomato, pepper, and eggplant crop protection in the last year or so. Here’s a quick reference for Ontario growers (this is probably not even a complete list). Unless otherwise noted, products are registered for control1 of the listed pests.

Fungicides, Bactericides

Aprovia (benzovindiflupyr)

  • Crops: Fruiting vegetables
    • Early blight, anthracnose, powdery mildew, septoria leaf spot
  • Notes: Group 7 fungicide.

Bravo ZN (chlorothalonil)

  • Crops: Tomato
    • Early blight, late blight, septoria leaf spot, anthracnose, botrytis gray mold
  • Notes: Group M fungicide.

Continue reading New pesticide registrations or label expansions for tomato, pepper, eggplant

Drop arms improve spray coverage on field peppers

Reposted from http://sprayers101.com/drop-arms-improve-spray-coverage-on-field-peppers/

Victoria Radauskas, OMAFRA

Field pepper in Southern Ontario in mid-July
Field pepper in Southern Ontario in mid-July

A farm supplier contacted us in early July on behalf of a client with a history of disease control issues in his field pepper operation. He wanted us to calibrate their sprayer and diagnose spray coverage to see if there was room for improvement. Coverage doesn’t equal efficacy, but it’s generally a reliable indicator. When we arrived at the field the winds were gusting over 15 km/h, which had the potential to create a massive drift issue. We were only spraying water, so it was decided that if we managed decent coverage in those conditions, there would be no need to worry on an acceptable spray day. Continue reading Drop arms improve spray coverage on field peppers