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Based on information from the website insectforecast.com, it appears the risk of corn earworm flights into Southwestern Ontario has increased significantly over the past week. The University of Illinois Fruit and Vegetable News also reports increased trap counts this week.

Female earworm moths lay their eggs on sweet corn at the green silk stage.  One female can lay up to 100 eggs per night over a 10 night period.  The eggs incubate for 2- 10 days, depending on the temperature. After the egg hatches there is a narrow window of opportunity to control this pest before it enters the protection of the husk.

During periods of potential corn earworm activity, apply a corn earworm insecticide at 50-60% silk, with a second insecticide application 4 days later. Note: corn earworm populations may have a high degree of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. The level of resistance varies greatly from year-to-year.

Pheromone trapping is an excellent tool to help monitor localized populations in specific sweet corn fields. For more information on trapping, visit Ontario CropIPM.

Two different types of pheromone traps used for corn earworm. The heliothis trap (rear) and the hartstack trap (front).

Two different types of pheromone traps used for corn earworm. The heliothis trap (rear) and the hartstack trap (front).

The Ontario Processing Vegetable Growers (OPVG) and the Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Processors Association (OF&VPA) are continuing with a bursary fund to support and encourage individuals pursuing a career in any aspect of the processing vegetable industry. These organizations are working together to ensure that there are new individuals who will have the interest, skills and abilities to further develop and grow this sector of Ontario’s agri-food economy.

Sponsor donations allow the OPVG and the OF&VPA to offer up to five bursaries to students this fall. These include bursaries in memory of former OPVG directors Jim Whitson and Ken Epp. Note that the Jim Whitson bursary is awarded to a student attending Ridgetown College. The award in memory of Ken Epp receives an additional $1,000 from the fund established in his name by the OPVG. Continue Reading »

Originally posted on onspecialtycrops:

Over the last few weeks, we have had numerous calls from homeowners and growers wondering why their basil is turning yellow and defoliating.  The reason in most cases is downy mildew.  Basil downy mildew seems to be particularly common this summer, likely due to the rainy weather and the fact that the disease first appeared in the field in mid-July rather than August which has been more typical.

In Ontario, the fungicides cyazofamid (Ranman and Torrent), mandipropamid (Revus) and phosphorous acid (Confine) are registered for control of downy mildew in commercial field basil.   All of these products are preventative, and will have limited effect on the disease once symptoms are widespread in the field.  It is important for growers to also be aware that once leaves are infected with downy mildew, it takes at least a week for symptoms to develop. Consequently, seemingly healthy leaves at harvest may develop symptoms…

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Late blight update

Previous 2014 late blight updates: August 8July 29July 25July 13, July 3.

Late blight has been confirmed on tomatoes in Elgin County, Chatham-Kent, and the Regional Municipality of Waterloo. Credible reports have also been received from other areas, including the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, Middlesex, and Perth County.

Recent weather has been conducive to the development and spread of late blight.  Commercial growers should scout often and ensure they are using fungicides with good late blight activity in their fungicide program.  When late blight is in the area, spray intervals should be shortened.

Know the symptoms. See the Tomato Late Blight Photo Gallery and refer to Late Blight Look-Alikes for photos of late blight and possible look-alikes on tomato.

See the late blight post from July 29 for fungicide recommendations for tomatoes in Ontario.

Contact OMAFRA at 519-674-1690 or janice.leboeuf@ontario.ca if you suspect you have found late blight in Ontario.

Marion Paibomesai, Vegetable Crops Specialist, OMAFRA

Michael Celetti, Plant Pathology Lead – Horticulture, OMAFRA

Onion downy mildew has been found on onions in Waterloo and York Regions (updated 18 Aug 2014).  In Ontario, this disease is common in July and August and if left uncontrolled, the size, quality and quantity of yield can be significantly reduced. The neck tissue of the affected onions may not ‘cure’ properly at harvest and is thus open to secondary fungal and bacterial pathogens which can further reduce yield quality. When cool, humid conditions are present particularly when the canopy of the crop is advanced, the risk of downy mildew increases. Foliar symptoms first appear as pale light green patches on infected leaves (Figure 1).

Figure 1. A purple-grey downy growth often appears in the lesions after a period of wet weather or when conditions favour dew formation.

Figure 1. A purple-grey downy growth often appears in the lesions after a period of wet weather or when conditions favour dew formation.

Continue Reading »

Cucurbit Downy Mildew has been identified in a cucumber field in Chatham-Kent, Ontario.  Levels were very low (< 1% of the field). The infection likely occurred within the past few days.  However, this does indicate that all area cucumber and melon fields are at a high risk of developing downy mildew at this time.

Continue to use a preventative fungicide program, rotating between the targeted downy mildew fungicides.  For more information on fungicide selection, see the Downy Mildew Report – July 11, 2014.

Previous 2014 late blight updates: July 29July 25July 13, July 3.

Although OMAFRA has not yet confirmed late blight in tomatoes in Ontario, credible reports of the disease in tomatoes are coming in from the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry and from Perth County. Once samples are examined, further updates will be available.

We do know, however, that is has been confirmed in tomato and potato in neighbouring states, where it is spreading.  It has also been confirmed in potatoes in Simcoe County.

Recent weather has been conducive to the development and spread of late blight.  Commercial growers should scout often and ensure they are using fungicides with good late blight activity in their fungicide program.  When late blight is in the area, spray intervals should be shortened.

See the late blight post from July 29 for fungicide recommendations for tomatoes in Ontario.

Contact OMAFRA at 519-674-1690 or janice.leboeuf@ontario.ca if you suspect you have found late blight in Ontario.

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