Tag Archives: brassicas

Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

The cabbage maggot (Delia radicum) is the larvae stage of the cabbage root fly which can cause severe damage to all Brassica crops. The adult cabbage maggot is a fly that is about half the size of a house fly and is grey in colour.

In the early spring, cabbage maggot flies emerge from the soil and the females lay small, white eggs ~2-10 cm below the soil line. Depending upon the temperature, eggs hatch 3-7 days later as larvae that immediately start boring Continue reading Cabbage Maggot; An old pest with limited options

Preventing Yield Loss from Flea Beetles

Flea beetles are a common crop pest of crucifers in Ontario and overwinter as adults near the soil surface in debris and stubble from the previous crop. They typically become active with the first extended period of warm weather in the early spring as the leaf litter begins to thaw. The beetles feed on weeds throughout the field and have the ability to fly on calm days and will attack brassica seedlings as they emerge or transplants as they are planted.

Females will begin laying eggs in soil for about 30 days. Flea beetle larvae will hatch from eggs 12 days later and feed on the root hairs and taproots of seedlings. Left unchecked, adults will feed on leaves of transplants and the larvae will burrowing into the plant near the juncture of the root and stem. Continue reading Preventing Yield Loss from Flea Beetles

Samples requested for clubroot survey

By Travis Cranmer, Vegetable Crops Specialist
OMAFRA

First appeared in ONvegetables in The Grower, April 2017.

Clubroot, caused by the soil-borne pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae can cause yellowing, stunting, wilting and club-like roots on susceptible Brassica species including broccoli, cabbage, canola and cauliflower. Clubroot causes an estimated yield loss of 10-15% in Brassica crops worldwide and in severely infested fields a 30-100% yield loss can occur. There are different races of clubroot known as pathotypes and the resistance of many cultivars is pathotype dependent.

severe clubbing, six weeks after seeding
Figure 1. Pak choy with severe clubbing, six weeks after seeding.

Continue reading Samples requested for clubroot survey

Got cabbage maggots? Invitation to brassica growers to collaborate in research

Article originally from HortMatters, Vol. 15, Issue No. 15, 15 July 2015

Did you know that a new research project on Cabbage Maggot in vegetable brassicas has just begun? The project pulls together a team to learn about the flies, Delia flies, which cause the pest known as Cabbage Maggot.Cabbage Maggot_larva 2 Continue reading Got cabbage maggots? Invitation to brassica growers to collaborate in research

Delegate Insecticide label expanded via Minor Use Program for control of additional insects on several crops in Canada

J. Chaput, OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator, Guelph

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of URMULE registrations for Delegate Insecticide for control of several additional insect pests on several crops in Canada. Delegate Insecticide was already labeled for use on a number of crops in Canada for control of insects. Continue reading Delegate Insecticide label expanded via Minor Use Program for control of additional insects on several crops in Canada

Success and Entrust Insecticide labels expanded via Minor Use Program for control of cabbage maggot on greenhouse broccoli transplants in Canada

J. Chaput, OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator, Guelph

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of URMULE registrations for SuccessTM and EntrustTM Insecticides for control of cabbage maggot on greenhouse broccoli transplants in Canada. SuccessTM and EntrustTM Insecticides were already labeled for use on many crops in Canada for a number of pests. Continue reading Success and Entrust Insecticide labels expanded via Minor Use Program for control of cabbage maggot on greenhouse broccoli transplants in Canada