Suspected late blight found on tomato in Chatham-Kent

Previous 2012 late blight updates: May 31June 4July 20July 27,  July 30, August 16.

OMAFRA staff have identified a suspected case of late blight in Chatham-Kent on tomato. Symptoms on leaves, stems, and fruit are consistent with late blight and show a positive using an Immunostrip test for Phytophthora. The sample has been submitted to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for lab confirmation.  Update: 2012 08 21 3:19 pm – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has confirmed the presence of late blight in the sample.

Remember that conventional tomato growers using a recommended fungicide program for early blight, septoria leaf spot, and anthracnose, are also protecting the crop from late blight infection. Cloudy and high humidity or wet conditions are favourable for late blight.  The pathogen prefers cool temperatures.  The disease is suppressed by hot, dry weather, but it can continue developing and spreading when suitable conditions return.

If late blight is found in the area:

  • Tighten up spray intervals – During wet cool periods, a fungicide should be applied every 5 – 7 days to protect against late blight. If the weather conditions become dry, the spray intervals may be extended.
  • Scout fields often.  Know the symptoms. Refer to Late Blight Look-Alikes for photos of late blight and possible look-alikes on tomato.

Figure 1. Late blight symptoms on tomato leaves appear as water soaked grey-brown lesions often surrounded by a light green or yellow halo.

Figure 1. Late blight symptoms on tomato leaves appear as water soaked grey-brown lesions often surrounded by a light green or yellow halo.

Figure 2: Early late blight symptoms on tomato

Figure 2: Early late blight symptoms on tomato

Fungicide recommendations:

  • chlorothalonil (Bravo, Echo), mancozeb (Manzate, Dithane), metiram (Polyram) – contact fungicides – have been very effective
  • Tanos, Revus – translaminar, some “kickback” activity – have some ability to move into the plant – can add to the fungicide program, but rotate chemistries and use in combination with protectants for resistance management
  • Acrobat – translaminar – has some ability to move into the plant – must be tank-mixed with another late blight fungicide from a different chemical family – can add to the fungicide program, but rotate chemistries
  • Presidio – translaminar, some “kickback” activity – registered (in tank mix with Bravo), but note that after using it, rotation to any crop except brassica (head and stem), bulb vegetables, cucurbit vegetables, fruiting vegetables, leafy vegetables (except brassica), root and tuber vegetables (except carrot and sugar beet) is prohibited

Past OMAFRA articles on tomato late blight are found under the late blight tag to the right.  Please report any occurrences so that we can keep the tomato community informed about its development and spread and so that we can collect samples to learn about the strains, fungicide sensitivity, and the biology of this evolving disease.

Contact OMAFRA at 519-674-1690 or janice.leboeuf@ontario.ca if you suspect you have found late blight in Ontario. Those in the US can contact their state cooperative extension service or report online at http://www.usablight.org/.

Note:  Organic producers may be interested in an article by Meg McGrath (Cornell University) on managing late blight in organically-produced tomato.  Note that crop protection products mentioned in her article relate to US registrations.  Consult the Canadian labels and your organic certifier for registered products that can be used in organic production.

2 thoughts on “Suspected late blight found on tomato in Chatham-Kent”

  1. I have late blight on many of my ripened tomatoes in London Ontario.. Question:
    1 – are the tomatoes OK for consumption?
    2 – should I leave the tomatoes and stalks out of my compost?

    thanks
    Max

    1. Very good questions!
      1. Tomato fruit that don’t show symptoms (see fruit symptoms at https://onvegetables.com/2013/08/27/late-blight-photo-gallery/) are fine to eat. Those with symptoms, you would not want to eat. You could find that after picking, the fruit develop lesions. They are safe to eat before the lesions develop, but once you see them, it’s a form of rot (and other rots will set in) and you wouldn’t want to eat or can them. Here’s a helpful article: http://extension.psu.edu/food/preservation/seasonal-topics/spring-summer/tomatoes-potatoes-late-blight.
      2. This article (http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/NewsArticles/Tom_LB_OrganicMgt10.html) gives good advice on destroying the affected plants — see step 8. (Note that any mention of pesticides in this article applies to New York State, though, and are not applicable here.)

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